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HEAD TO HEAD: Dressing it down means less stress

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HEAD TO HEAD: Dressing it down means less stress

Veronica Townsend and Gillian Burks showing off their respective sides.

Veronica Townsend and Gillian Burks showing off their respective sides.

Photo by: Brooklynne Propes

Veronica Townsend and Gillian Burks showing off their respective sides.

Photo by: Brooklynne Propes

Photo by: Brooklynne Propes

Veronica Townsend and Gillian Burks showing off their respective sides.

Gillian Burks, Features Editor

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The everyday student already bears the weight of homework, exams and extracurriculars, not to mention stress they encounter in their personal life. Getting up early to look your best could be a hassle most students don’t want to even consider.

Many teachers emphasize that we should dress as if we were going to work, because school is our “job”. To say that is a bit over the line: we don’t get paid, we didn’t interview and we won’t be fired for showing up in jeans. Most of us only go to school because we have to. Expecting someone to put on a tie and go somewhere they don’t want to sounds like a family reunion.

Setting aside professional looking outfits and waking up with enough time to fix your hair, and even makeup for some, would mean less time for teens to sleep. According to a Stanford Med 2006 National Sleep Foundation poll “more than 87% of high school students in the United States get far less than the recommended eight to ten hours – a serious threat to their health, safety, and academic success.” To assign a pile of homework that keeps students up to the early morning hours and then expect them to get up early to dress for success before they race to beat the bus is cruel.

In addition to sleep deprivation, stress plays a major role in the health and safety of students and adults. “You’re kids, what do you have to worry about?” Well, a recent survey released from the American Psychological Association suggests that teens reported having higher stress levels than adults. With the addition of professional attire, most students would need to buy a new wardrobe and plan their outfits either that morning or the night before. The stress is entirely unneeded and can cause more harm than good. Students suffer enough with the stress of maintaining good grades, balancing extracurricular activities, and holding a job on top of that. By wearing sweat pants and T-shirts students can feel relaxed in their classroom environment, and be more receptive to the lessons being taught.

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HEAD TO HEAD: Dressing it down means less stress